Myeloproliferative neoplasms

What are myeloproliferative neoplasms?

Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are a group of blood cancers that begin with an abnormal change in a stem cell in the bone marrow. This change causes the bone marrow to make too many of any one or more kinds of blood cells.


This group of blood disorders includes polycythemia vera, essential (primary) thrombocythemia and myelofibrosis.
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Woman with doctor

In Canada, it is estimated that up to 1,500 new cases of MPN are diagnosed per year.

You are not alone.

Know that the blood cancer community is here to support you every step of the way.

Resources on Myeloproliferative neoplasms

There are four main types of MPN.

The treatment for MPN varies according to the type and stage of the disease with the goal of slowing or stopping the disease from becoming acute myeloid leukemia (AML). After treatment, many people get relief from the symptoms of MPN. You may find that knowing more about the disease and its treatment can help you cope. 

Four main types of myeloproliferative neoplasms

Essential thrombocythemia (ET)

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Myelofibrosis (MF)

MF-Web-Headers

Polycythemia Vera (PV)

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Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia (CNL)

CNL-Web-Headers